JusticeWatch: Making a mockery of justice

Posted by - 11th January 2019

Making a mockery of justice Tuckers, the defence firm representing a convicted killer who has absconded, denied being ‘professional embarrassed’ following an outcry over the granting of legal aid for his appeal – as reported in the Justice Gap here. Jack Shepherd was found guilty in his absence in July last year of the manslaughter

Read More

Christmas at the foodbank: ‘I’m living off food vouchers’

Posted by - 21st December 2018

There are already 15 people at the foodbank at St Matthew’s Church, just off the busy Wandsworth Bridge Road, South Fulham by the time we arrive shortly after doors open. Volunteer Sue is on hand to make sure everyone receives a cheery welcome and a hot cuppa as they wait to pick up their emergency

Read More

Doing it Yourself: litigants in person in the post-LASPO family court

Posted by - 14th December 2018

The reforms to legal aid in England and Wales have been the subject of significant controversy since their implementation under the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders (LASPO) Act in April 2013. In my recently completed doctoral research, I examined the ways in which this has marked a fundamental shift in how different people

Read More

JusticeWatch: ‘The dead rat is still there…’

Posted by - 7th December 2018

Justice in a time of austerity The BBC’s home affairs correspondent Dominic Casciani made an unpleasant discovery at the Royal Courts of Justice. ‘The dead rat is still there,’ he tweeted. He couldn’t attach a photo because ‘that’s a breach of the law banning filming in courts’. ‘So here, for the one and only time,

Read More

Labour vows to reinstate legal aid for benefit apeals

Posted by - 6th December 2018

The shadow justice minister has promised to commit a Labour government to reinstating legal aid for benefits appeals as soon as it takes power. Writing for the Guardian yesterday, Labour MP Richard Burgon wrote that out of all the cuts to legal aid, ‘the slashing of advice for ill and disabled people unfairly denied their

Read More

The great fallacy of mandatory sentencing laws

Posted by - 6th December 2018

The great fallacy of mandatory sentencing laws is the thought that being tough on crime will deter people from committing crimes in the first place. This is an attractive prospect, as legal professionals and policymakers we strive to see less people incarcerated and going through the criminal legal system. Yet as Ed Davey MP, the

Read More

JusticeWatch: A lawyer-free zone

Posted by - 30th November 2018

A change is coming The government has found an extra £23m spending for barristers’ trial fees in serious criminal cases – reported the BBC at the weekend. In April, the MoJ introduced changes to the Advocates’ Graduated Fee Scheme. ‘The new system, along with existing concerns, prompted a period of industrial action by some criminal

Read More