Calais convoy: a lawyer writes

Posted by - 7th July 2016

James Nichol is best known for his miscarriage of justice work (Bridgewater Four; M25 Three; Colin Wallace). Here he explains why the refugee crisis has led him to forge a new temporary career – as a wholesaler. (Sketch by Dilly Boase) We finally made it to Calais (see here). First things first. The total amount

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Brexit makes a review of legal aid all the more urgent

Posted by - 1st July 2016

The Ministry of Justice published its quarterly legal aid statistics. It is a picture of the first full three years after the civil legal aid cuts of 2013. What do they tell us about the state of access to justice in England and Wales? A version of this article appeared on the Law Centres Network website

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Five years after the riots – and not a single lesson learned

Posted by - 28th June 2016

The CPS response to the 2011 riots was its finest hour, but successive cuts mean today’s service would be unable to cope with a similar level of disorder, says a former senior Crown prosecutor who has asked to remain anonymous. When I was asked to write an article to mark the fifth anniversary of the

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JusticeWatch: So what happens now?

Posted by - 24th June 2016

What next? Human rights lawyers – and everyone else – are trying to make sense of this morning’s bombshell. ‘As a human rights lawyer, I have been asked to write a short blog on the impact to human rights in the UK following Brexit,’ began Matt Evans for the Justice Gap. ‘The current high regard for

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JusticeWatch: Baker Smalls and anti-social media

Posted by - 17th June 2016

Anti-social media Law firms looking for a cautionary tale to illustrate the business risks of engaging in social media (especially if you can’t trust yourself not to do something gratuitously offensive), should familiarise themselves with the sorry tale of Baker Smalls. Local authority clients have been bailing on the firm at some speed over the last

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‘The decision to resume the Birmingham pub bombing inquests is an important day for justice’

Posted by - 17th June 2016

The legal battle to reopen the Birmingham pub bombing inquests highlights the challenges lawyers on both sides of the Irish Sea face when holding state bodies to account, says Belfast litigation consultant Christopher Stanley. Picture of  Maxine Hambleton who was just 18 years of age when she died in 1974. The recent decision by Louise Hunt, senior coroner for

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